Art Terminology

SOCIAL REALISM

Refers to any realist painting that also carries a clearly discernible social or political comment. In Britain examples of social realism can be found in the eighteenth century, for example in the work of William Hogarth, but it became particularly widespread in the nineteenth century. Important contributions to social realism were made by the Pre-Raphaelites, …

SOCIAL REALISM Read More »

SOCIAL SCULPTURE

Social sculpture is a theory developed by the artist Joseph Beuys in the 1970s based on the concept that everything is art, that every aspect of life could be approached creatively and, as a result, everyone has the potential to be an artist. Social sculpture united Joseph Beuys’s idealistic ideas of a utopian society together …

SOCIAL SCULPTURE Read More »

SOCIAL TURN

Social turn was first used in 2006 to describe the recent return to socially engaged art that is collaborative, often participatory and involves people as the medium or material of the work. The term was coined by the art historian Claire Bishop in her 2006 essay The Social Turn: Collaboration and Its Discontents. Art that …

SOCIAL TURN Read More »

SOCIALIST REALISM

A form of modern realism imposed in Russia by Stalin following his rise to power after the death of Lenin in 1924, characterised in painting by rigorously optimistic pictures of Soviet life painted in a realist style. The doctrine was formally proclaimed by Maxim Gorky at the Soviet Writers Congress of 1934, although not precisely …

SOCIALIST REALISM Read More »

SOCIALLY ENGAGED PRACTICE

Socially engaged practice describes art that is collaborative, often participatory and involves people as the medium or material of the work. Introduction Socially engaged practice, also referred to as social practice or socially engaged art, can include any artform which involves people and communities in debate, collaboration or social interaction. This can often be organised …

SOCIALLY ENGAGED PRACTICE Read More »

SOLARISATION

Technique that involves exposing a partially developed photograph to light, before continuing processing, creating halo-like effects. The technique was discovered accidentally by Man Ray and Lee Miller and quickly adopted by Man Ray as a means to ‘escape from banality’. He often applied the technique to photographs of female nudes, using the halo-like outlines around …

SOLARISATION Read More »

SOUND ART

Art which uses sound both as its medium (what it is made out of) and as its subject (what it is about). Sound art dates back to the early inventions of futurist Luigi Russolo who, between 1913 and 1930, built noise machines that replicated the clatter of the industrial age and the boom of warfare. …

SOUND ART Read More »

Visit our gallery

Enter your contact details below and a member of our team will contact you with an available booking slot.